Question: out of the 15 stats of matter how many can be found on earth and where can the others be found

Keywords: , ,

  1. Thanks for your question – I had to google this one as I couldn’t list 15 and found this list:
    1 The three classical states
    1.1 Solid
    1.2 Liquid
    1.3 Gas
    2 Non classical states
    2.1 Glass
    2.2 Crystals with some degree of disorder
    2.3 Liquid crystal states
    2.4 Magnetically ordered
    3 Low-temperature states
    3.1 Superfluids
    3.2 Bose-Einstein condensates
    3.3 Fermionic condensates
    3.4 Rydberg molecules
    3.5 Quantum Hall states
    3.6 Strange matter
    4 High-energy states
    4.1 Plasma (ionized gas)
    4.2 Quark-gluon plasma
    5 Very high energy states
    6 Other proposed states
    6.1 Degenerate matter
    6.2 Supersolid
    6.3 String-net liquid
    6.4 Superglass

    (it’s just from wikipedia if you google states of matter!)
    The ‘theoretical’ ones under section 6 we don’t have on Earth but might one day be able to make using a particle accelerator. All of the others I believe we either have around us normally like liquid, solids and gases, or we can make them in the lab like plasma, bose-einstein condensates or the other ones in section 4.

    Have a read of the article though if you want to know more:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_of_matter

    0

  2. Oh I am not sure, but we could work it out….I know of solid, gas, liquid, plasma…..

    0

  3. Solid, liquid and gas appear naturally on Earth, and you can sometimes see things like plasmas. There are other things, “non-classical” states that also exist like glass, and magnetically ordered. Other states I imagine would only exist in the laboratory environment or out in space at the extremes – Bose-Einstein condensates have been created, as well as plasmas. Some really extreme states don’t readily occur in nature on the earth, such as quark-gluon plasmas. Some of these things may exist for split-seconds during rare interactions – I’m not sure about that though.

    0

Comments

  1. Wow, I never knew physical states could get so involved! Why does glass have its own physical state?

    0